12 Times Table


I cov­ered the 1 to 10 times tables in the post How to Learn Your Times Tables Fast but it helps to also learn your 11 and 12 times tables. We looked at the 11 times table. Here are one or two tips to remem­ber the 12 times table.

At first sight the twelve times table seems more dif­fi­cult than the eleven times table:-

  • 1 x 12 = 12
  • 2 x 12 = 24
  • 3 x 12 = 36
  • 4 x 12 = 48
  • 5 x 12 = 60
  • 6 x 12 = 72
  • 7 x 12 = 84
  • 8 x 12 = 96
  • 9 x 12 = 108
  • 10 x 12 = 120
  • 11 x 12 = 132
  • 12 x 12 = 144

In this table I have tried to space the answers so that the first dig­its (tens) and last dig­its (units) are lined up.

The first dig­its (tens) have a pat­tern: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14– just count upwards but every 5th num­ber jump 2. This is because when you are mul­ti­ply­ing by 12 you are mul­ti­ply­ing by 10 + 2– so at every fifth sum you jump by ten (5 x 2).

The last dig­its also have a pat­tern: 2, 4, 6, 8, 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 0, 2, 4 — count in twos but when you get to 1o (becomes zero) you go back to 2.

This is all best under­stood using an exam­ple. What is 7 x 12.

Let’s do the tens first. So just count but jump 2 every fifth num­ber (if you count on your fin­gers and thumb– its a good reminder to jump) and we need the sev­enth num­ber in the sequence:

1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8

So the tens =  8

Next the units and the sev­enth num­ber in the sequence:

2, 4, 6, 8, 0, 2, 4

So the units = 4

and our answer is 84

Just keep practicing.

For exam­ple what about 12 x 12?

Let’s do the tens first. So just count but jump 2 every fifth num­ber and we need the twelth num­ber in the sequence:

1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14

So the tens =  14

Next the units and the sev­enth num­ber in the sequence:

2, 4, 6, 8, 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 0, 2, 4

So the units = 4

and our answer is 144

I came up with these meth­ods for the 11 and 12 times as a result of a com­ment left in my orig­i­nal “How to Learn Your Times Table Fast” post. Do you have bet­ter tricks for the eleven and twelve times tables? Do you think these tech­niques work, or is best to just learn through rep­e­ti­tion? I think a mix­ture of learn­ing tricks and rep­e­ti­tion is best and that think­ing about the tech­niques and the logic behind them helps to secure the tables in your mem­ory. It would be great to hear your opinion.


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